Saturday, January 24, 2015

Awards-Nazi Award Nominations: Best Director

These directors are all master storytellers, but what I particularly love about this group is how they've all told their stories in such different ways. They represent a rich array of stylistic voices and I can't wait to see what they churn out next!

But before looking ahead too far, one look back at the Best Directors of 2014:

DAMIEN CHAZELLE for Whiplash
Chazelle will convince you that you have a good ear for jazz while you're watching his film, because he does such a brilliant job of tuning us into Andrew's acoustic senses with selectively focussed shots and a precise sound design. Few directors can make instrumental music come alive on film the way Chazelle does in the film's climatic explosion of bravura filmmaking.

AVA DUVERNAY for Selma
DuVernay's direction is never less than gripping, using beautifully composed images and carefully selected music to make some striking juxtapositions. Because she takes so much care to keep us engaged throughout, by the time the film reaches its epic finale, it's every bit as stirring as it aims to be despite being a predictable dramatic beat. That is the mark of expert storytelling.

ALEJANDRO GONZÁLEZ IÑÁRRITU for Birdman
Iňárritu has taken some bold artistic risks with this extraordinary experimental foray into comedy, not the least of which is his flashy, “unedited” single-take approach that allows us to see the world from Riggan Thompson's eyes. Much like his central antihero, he has put himself out on the line, working well outside his artistic comfort zone to deliver the most unlikely triumph of his career.

RICHARD LINKLATER for Boyhood
In the hands of a lesser director, the patient twelve-year process behind this piece might be dismissed by some as a conceptual gimmick. But Linklater has clearly dedicated himself to a creative vision, taking the fragmented instants of a childhood – the agony, the ecstasy, and the mundane – and elevating it to high art.

BENNETT MILLER for Foxcatcher
Intelligent, precise, and subtle to a fault, the anonymity of Miller's signature is in fact his greatest asset. Every facet of his craft is calibrated to serve story, character, theme, and tone. You could freeze every frame of this picture and parse it for meaning. Absorbing, masterful filmmaking.

Just missed:
WES ANDERSON for The Grand Budapest Hotel
GARETH EDWARDS for Godzilla
TOMM MOORE for Song of the Sea
CHRISTOPHER NOLAN for Interstellar
ISAO TAKAHATA for The Tale of Princess Kaguya

5 comments:

  1. Shame that you couldn't find room for Wes Anderson to squeeze in. Great choices nonetheless.

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  2. I'm a little surprised...Gareth Edwards?

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  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  4. Best Director:

    Birdman – Alejandro González Iñárritu
    Boyhood – Richard Linklater
    Foxcatcher – Bennett Miller
    The Grand Budapest Hotel – Wes Anderson
    Inherent Vice – Paul Thomas Anderson

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